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Estimates Trouble Codes P0014

P0014: Bank 1 Exhaust Camshaft Advanced Timing

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What is P0014?

DTC P0014 is a generic powertrain code defined as “Exhaust Camshaft Timing – Over-Advanced Bank 1.”

Code P0014 indicates that the car’s Engine Control Module (ECU) senses problems with the camshaft timing — specifically the exhaust camshaft in Bank 1, position B. The exhaust camshaft position B is responsible for controlling the valves which release engine carbon emissions.

Code P0014 is only applicable to vehicles with a Variable Valve Timing system. Variable Valve Timing is responsible for improving engine performance and fuel efficiency, allowing your engine to gain more horsepower and speed. It does this by regulating the opening/closing of the exhaust valve and intake valve, controlling the combustion of the fuel-air mixture.

The VVT system consists of the camshafts, camshaft actuator or cam phaser, solenoid valve, the Engine Control Module, and the oil line.

Common symptoms

OBD II code P0014 can potentially manifest itself in various ways, more commonly through the engine light and oil level light. 

Here’s a list of possible symptoms for engine code P0014: 

  • Rough idle or hard start to the engine
  • Engine stalling 
  • Engine noise
  • Decreased fuel economy
  • Low oil level warning light
  • Illuminated check engine light
  • Failed emissions test 

Sometimes, the camshaft sensor may also send a warning message to the ECU, turning the check engine light on.

Can I still drive?

Fault code P0014 is pretty severe. The engine may run erratically in the worst-case scenario, and your car may face a stopping problem. 

A camshaft is a metallic rail that sits above the cylinders, at the top of the engine. It’s marked by egg-shaped projections known as cam lobes that align with the valves. As the camshaft rotates, the peaked end of the cam lobes contacts a lever called ‘rocker arm,’ opening the engine valve. Once the lobe’s peak moves past the rocker arm, the lever moves back to its original position, closing the valve. This movement is perfectly synchronized to the movement of the crankshaft with the help of the timing chain. 

Prolonged driving with an out-of-time camshaft may also bring the valves in contact with the piston, causing a bent valve stem. So, to avoid costly repairs and retain driving safety, you should contact a mechanic as soon as you detect code P0014 in your engine.

P0014 causes

There are many likely triggers for trouble code P0014. 

Some of these include: 

  • Dirty or old engine oil
  • Low engine oil levels
  • Camshaft variable timing exhaust solenoid or actuator solenoid failure
  • Continuous oil flow to variable camshaft timing chamber

Diagnosis

In most cases, engine code P0014 requires an oil change and oil level diagnosis. However, if that doesn’t resolve the code, you’ll need to perform an intermediate-level exhaust camshaft diagnosis. 

Note: This can be a time-intensive process for inexperienced drivers and may require specialized equipment. So it’s best to let your mechanic handle the diagnosis and repair. 

That being said, here’s how your mechanic will usually diagnose code P0014: 

  1. Use an OBD-II scan tool to check for other engine codes.
  2. Check the engine for dirty or low oil levels affecting the oil pressure and oil flow. You may need an oil change.
  3. Inspect the valve train for sludge buildup. Ensure that the VVT solenoid is clean and nothing is blocking the oil flow to the oil control valve. Examine the intake and exhaust cam and the exhaust valve. 
  4. Inspect the Bank 1 Exhaust Camshaft Oil Control Valve for proper functioning. This can be done by removing the oil control valve and briefly supplying power to the VVT solenoid. If the valve doesn’t click or move, there may be a faulty oil control valve. 
  5. Take a test drive. If the issue persists, there could be internal engine damage.

Possible repairs for P0014 & Costs

Engine code P0014 can be caused by several issues, including low oil levels, problems with the camshaft variable timing solenoid or camshaft phaser, etc. 

Depending on the diagnosis, you may need to correct or replace: 

  • Old oil (get an oil change) using the proper oil viscosity for the engine
  • The camshaft oil control valve wiring for the Bank 1 exhaust camshaft
  • The camshaft position sensor or correct the engine light sensor
  • The camshaft oil control valve for Bank 1 exhaust camshaft
  • The timing chain and camshaft actuators, as directed by the service manual 

A timing chain or timing belt synchronizes the rotation of the crankshaft and camshaft, ensuring the engine’s valves open and close properly during each cylinder’s firing. It sometimes also powers the water pump, oil pump, and injection pump and helps maintain the camshaft and crankshaft position. 

A camshaft phaser (also known as camshaft actuators) is located at the heart of the Variable Valve Timing system. The camshaft phaser is responsible for altering and adjusting the position of the camshafts to adjust the engine’s valve timing. This is done by an oil control solenoid valve (VVT solenoid) that applies oil pressure to activate the phaser. The PCM then controls the VVT solenoid based on input from various sensors.

The fault codes should then be reset, and a road test performed to see if the codes persist.

The cost of Bank 1 Exhaust Camshaft resolution can vary depending on the repairs you implement. 

That being said, here’s a general estimate of various variable valve timing system repairs (excluding diagnosis costs): 

  • VVT solenoid or VCT control unit replacement: $500 to $1500
  • Variable camshaft timing control solenoid valve: $200 to $500
  • Timing chain or timing belt replacement: $600 to $3000

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